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Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic(LOS ANGELES) -- After spending their quarantine apart, Julianne Hough and Brooks Laich have decided to make the separation official.

The two confirm to People they have decided to split after almost three years of marriage.

"We have lovingly and carefully taken the time we have needed to arrive at our decision to separate," they say in a joint statement. "We share an abundance of love and respect for one another and will continue to lead with our hearts from that place. We kindly request your compassion and respect for our privacy moving forward."

During the pandemic, Hough has been social distancing in Los Angeles, while Laich has been staying in Idaho. A source close to the couple says the fact that they were completely fine living apart made them realize it was time to make a change.

"It's over, it's been over for a while, and it's time to just call it what it is — and it is over," the source tells People. "There is honestly no ill will. He loves her. She loves him. I can truly say they always will. But they both understand they are not meant to go through their lives as husband and wife to each other."

Despite the split, the two appear to be on good terms. Earlier this week, Hough commented on Laich’s shirtless “thirst trap” Instagram photos, writing, "This is awesome haha. Also the fact that you just figured out what a thirst trap is…”

The 31-year-old former Dancing with the Stars pro and the 36-year-old hockey player tied the knot in July 2017.

By Andrea Tuccillo
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Samara Heisz/iStockBy WILLIAM MANSELL and EMILY SHAPIRO, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 361,000 people worldwide.

Over 5.9 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations' outbreaks.

The United States is the world's worst-affected country, with over 1.7 million diagnosed cases and at least 101,706 deaths.

Here's how the news is developing Friday. All times Eastern:

4:05 p.m.: At least 86 NYC homeless dead from virus

In New York City, at least 1,060 homeless individuals have tested positive for the coronavirus, including 86 who have died, according to the city's Department of Social Services.

The homeless are among the most vulnerable, and among the 1,060 who tested positive, 55 were considered unsheltered New Yorkers. The vast majority were considered sheltered.

HUD defines unsheltered as those whose primary nighttime location is not ordinarily used for sleeping, like the street or a park.

3:15 p.m.: Trump says US terminating relationship with WHO


In the face of a global pandemic and protests across the country, President Donald Trump announced at a Friday afternoon news conference that the U.S. is ending its partnership with the World Health Organization.

"We will be, today, terminating our relationship with the World Health Organization and redirecting those funds to worldwide, and deserving, urgent global public health needs," he said.

Trump also said that Hong Kong is no longer autonomous from China.

"We will take action to revoke Hong Kong's preferential treatment as a separate customs and travel territory from the rest of China," the president continued. "The United States will also take necessary steps to sanction ERC and Hong Kong officials directly or indirectly involved in eroding Hong Kong's autonomy."

The president did not take questions or comment on the events in Minnesota.

2:35 p.m.: North Carolina asks RNC questions on convention safety


North Carolina sent a letter to the Republican National Committee on Friday, further pressing Republicans about their plans for the party's convention.

In a letter from Mandy Cohen, secretary of the state's Department of Health and Human Services, North Carolina included a number of asks for GOP leaders to "further elaborate on its plans to protect convention participants and the people of Charlotte in accordance with the CDC guidance."

The letter included a list of questions: How many delegates, alternates, elected officials, guests and media are expected to attend and be inside the Spectrum Center? How will the RNC implement health screenings, social distancing, face coverings, hand hygiene and other cleaning protocols at all RNC-sanctioned events? Is the RNC is still following Trump's desire to host a convention with "a crowd-like setting" without social distancing and face coverings? How will people be isolated if they do not pass thermal or health screenings?

While the letter acknowledges that a large-scale event can occur during the pandemic, state health officials urge the GOP to plan for "several scenarios."

"The state continues to support the hosting of the Republican National Convention in Charlotte if it can be done safely," Cohen wrote.

RNC officials replied to that letter though a statement Friday afternoon, saying they had hoped the governor's office would provide "concrete details on how to plan" for the convention.

"After all, if public schools can be opened early on August 17th we should know how to proceed with an event on August 24th," the RNC said. "Instead we do not have a commitment that provides clarity or guidance. Like the rest of the state, we will be ready and waiting for North Carolina leadership to offer clear guidance on how we should safely plan for the type of convention for which we originally contracted."

The RNC had initially sent a letter on Thursday to North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper outlining some safety protocols, signaling the party's preference to keep the convention in Charlotte after President Donald Trump threatened to pull it.

The letter, signed by RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel and Marcia Lee Kelly, the president and chief executive officer of the Republican National Convention, comes as the national party and the Democratic governor found themselves in a stalemate, after Trump tweeted that he is considering moving the event outside of North Carolina.

Absent from the RNC's letter were mentions of social distancing and wearing masks.

2 p.m.: CDC: 115,000 US deaths by June 20


Deaths in the U.S. likely will exceed 115,000 by June 20, even as the rate of increase in cumulative deaths declines, according to the latest update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The rate of new deaths is expected to vary from state to state, the CDC said, adding that "in some states, cumulative deaths will increase at roughly the same rate as they have in recent weeks, while other states are likely to experience only a small number of additional deaths from COVID-19."

1:30 p.m.: NYC on track to begin reopening June 8

New York City is on track to begin its phase one of reopening on June 8, bringing back to work about 400,000 employees, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Friday.

"Remember that reopening does not mean we're going back ... we go forward," Cuomo stressed. "It is reopening to a new normal, a safer normal. People will be wearing masks, people will be socially distanced."

Meanwhile, in upstate New York, five regions -- North Country, Finger Lakes, Central New York, Mohawk Valley and Southern Tier -- are now entering phase two of reopening.

That means retail curbside pickup will be open, and hair salons and barber shops can open with strict guidelines, he said.

1 p.m.: CDC cites evidence of limited early spread in US in early 2020


While the first cases of non-travel-related COVID-19 in the U.S. were confirmed Feb. 26 and Feb. 28, four pieces of evidence suggest that community transition transmission of the virus in the U.S. likely started in mid to late January or early February, according to a weekly report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC's findings included an RNA analysis that revealed a single lineage of the virus that was imported from China and began circulating in the U.S. between Jan. 18 and Feb. 9, followed by viruses of different lineages from Europe, and that three cases had been confirmed in California in early February.

That means "community transmission began before the first two non-travel-related U.S. cases, most likely from a single importation from China in late January or early February, followed by several importations from Europe in February and March," the CDC said.

11:50 a.m.: North Carolina asks RNC questions on convention safety

North Carolina responded to the Republican National Committee in a new letter Friday, further pressing Republicans about their plans for the party's convention.

In a letter from Mandy Cohen, secretary of the state's Department of Health and Human Services, North Carolina included a number of asks for GOP leaders to "further elaborate on its plans to protect convention participants and the people of Charlotte in accordance with the CDC guidance."

The letter included a list of questions: How many delegates, alternates, elected officials, guests and media are expected to attend and be inside the Spectrum Center? How will the RNC implement health screenings, social distancing, face coverings, hand hygiene and other cleaning protocols at all RNC-sanctioned events? Is the RNC is still following Trump's desire to host a convention with "a crowd-like setting" without social distancing and face coverings? How will people be isolated if they do not pass thermal or health screenings?

While the letter acknowledges that a large-scale event can occur during the pandemic, state health officials urge the GOP to plan for "several scenarios."

"The state continues to support the hosting of the Republican National Convention in Charlotte if it can be done safely," Cohen wrote.

The RNC sent a letter Thursday to North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper outlining some safety protocols, signaling the party's preference to keep the convention in Charlotte after President Donald Trump threatened to pull it.

The letter, signed by RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel and Marcia Lee Kelly, the president and chief executive officer of the Republican National Convention, comes as the national party and the Democratic governor found themselves in a stalemate, after Trump tweeted that he is considering moving the event outside of North Carolina.

Absent from the RNC's letter were mentions of social distancing and wearing masks.

11:30 a.m.: First known cases of MIS-C in Wisconsin


Wisconsin has become the latest state to report cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children, aka MIS-C, a dangerous coronavirus-related illness that's been reported in many states and countries.

The hospital Children's Wisconsin has identified an undisclosed number of cases and said most children have recovered, either in the hospital or at home, reported ABC Green Bay affiliate WBAY.

The suspected cases have been reported to Wisconsin's Department of Health Services, WBAY said.

MIS-C, which has been reported in at least 28 states and Washington, D.C., has features similar to those of Kawasaki disease and Toxic-Shock Syndrome. Common symptoms include persistent fever, irritability or sluggishness, abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, rash, conjunctivitis, enlarged lymph node on one side of the neck, red cracked lips or red tongue, swollen hands and feet.

10:30 a.m.: NYC sees record-low number of residents testing positive

Hard-hit New York City has reached a record-low of number of residents testing positive -- of those tested across the city, just 5% were positive for the coronavirus, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Friday.

New York City has 16,673 confirmed COVID-19 deaths and another 4,742 probable COVID-19 deaths.

The mayor on Friday promised more coronavirus testing for the city's non-profit workers, from those with the Department of Social Services to the Administration of Children's Services.

"We know that a lot of people who do this work" come from communities hit hardest by the coronavirus, de Blasio said. "They've been heroes throughout this crisis and we have to be there for them."

Beginning June 1, voluntary, weekly testing will be available for nearly 31,000 non-profit workers. Officials will be able to conduct 4,000 tests per day, he said.

De Blasio also highlighted that the city is sending 100,000 internet-enabled tablets to isolated seniors at 100 different public housing sites.

The tablets not only give seniors access to telemedicine, but also helps them fight isolation and stay in touch with loved ones.

9:50 a.m.: San Francisco unveils reopening plan

San Francisco Mayor London Breed on Thursday unveiled a multi-step reopening plan for the Northern California city.

Before June 15, residents can use curbside retail and go to real estate appoints if they social distance and wear face coverings. Professional sports can practice if they have approved plan and residents can use fenced dog parks and outdoor museums.

Beginning June 15, outdoor fitness can resume, like yoga, but with social distancing.

Outdoor dining -- including restaurants and bars with food -- can resume, as well as religious services and professional sports games without spectators.

Further steps will include reopening indoor dining, hair salons and barber shops. The current target date for that is July 13.

The target date is mid-August to reopen gyms and bars without food.

At least 2,437 people in San Francisco have been diagnosed with the coronavirus. At least 30 people have died.

7:25 a.m.: RNC sends letter to North Carolina outlining safety protocols for convention

The Republican National Committee sent a letter Thursday to North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper outlining some safety protocols to move forward with the Republican convention during the coronavirus pandemic -- signaling the party's preference to keep the convention in Charlotte after President Donald Trump threatened to pull it.

The letter, signed by RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel and Marcia Lee Kelly, the president and CEO of the Republican National Convention, comes as the national party and the Democratic governor found themselves in a stalemate, after Trump tweeted that he is considering moving the event outside of North Carolina.

In response to the RNC’s letter, a spokesperson for Gov. Roy Cooper said the governor’s office will share a response to the letter on Friday, after review from state health officials.

“We are still waiting for a plan from the RNC, but our office will work with state health officials to review the letter and share a response tomorrow,” Sadie Weiner, a spokesperson for Cooper, said in a statement to ABC News.

The RNC did not intend for the letter to be the plan, with a convention spokesperson telling ABC News the safety measures included in the letter are “a few suggested elements under consideration.”

Absent from the RNC's letter were mentions of social distancing and wearing masks.

5:33 a.m.: California sheriff says officers won't enforce coronavirus public health orders

Sonoma County Sheriff Mark Essick penned a letter to residents saying he is directing his department to not enforce the public health order, saying the blanket order is crushing the community.

In this letter, Essick said the many residents and business owners have told him that the county's health orders are far more strict than neighboring communities and California Gov. Gavin Newsom's statewide orders. He also said that the county's coronavirus cases continue to decline.

"Over the last 10 weeks we have learned a lot and made significant progress. The curve has been flattened; hospitals were not overrun with patients; we have dramatically increased testing which verified the infection rate in Sonoma County is under control and decreasing. Yet we continue to see successive Public Health Orders that contain inconsistent restrictions on business and personal activities without explanation," Essick wrote. "Based on what we have learned, now is the time to move to a risk-based system and move beyond blanket orders that are crushing our community."

He says he's asked, and not heard from, public health officials about why the restrictive measures remain despite the community having favorable COVID-19 numbers. To continue to enforce these measures, he said, would be a disservice to the county's residents.

The Sonoma County Sheriff's Office, he said, will stop enforcing local coronavirus regulations as of June 1.

"As your elected Sheriff, I can no longer in good conscience continue to enforce Sonoma County Public Health Orders, without explanation, that criminalize otherwise lawful business and personal behavior," Essick's letter said.

California has more than 103,000 diagnosed cases and at least 3,993 deaths.

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Pool/Max Mumby/Getty ImagesBy KATIE KINDELAN, ABC News

(LONDON) -- As with many brides around the world, Princess Beatrice had to postpone her wedding due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Beatrice's mom, Sarah Ferguson, took to social media Friday to mark what would have been her oldest daughter's wedding day.

"Love you my darling Beatrice," Ferguson wrote on Instagram and Twitter, alongside a throwback photo of a young Beatrice, whose father is Prince Andrew. "You have given me more joy than I could ever wish for. I am so excited to celebrate yours and Edo’s love when we all are out of lockdown."

"The most important thing is health and love and today I send it to you and all the other people that were getting married during this time .. so proud of you all," she wrote.

Beatrice, 31, and her fiance, Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi, were scheduled to wed Friday at the Chapel Royal at St. James's Palace in London, where Prince George, the son of Beatrice's cousin Prince William and his wife Kate, was baptized in 2013.

The wedding ceremony was to be followed by a private reception hosted by Beatrice's grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, in Buckingham Palace's gardens.

Instead of gathering together for a happy occasion, members of the royal family are following stay-at-home orders at their residences across the U.K. and in Los Angeles, where Beatrice's cousin, Prince Harry, and his wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, now live.

Buckingham Palace has not yet announced a new date for Beatrice and Mozzi's wedding.

The couple got engaged in Italy last September. Their engagement was announced by Buckingham Palace later that month.

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Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesBy ALEXANDRA SVOKOS, ABC News

(WASHINGTON) -- Former President Barack Obama put out a statement on George Floyd, a black man who died after being pinned down by police in Minneapolis.

"This shouldn't be 'normal' in 2020 America," he wrote. "It can't be 'normal.' If we want our children to grow up in a nation that lives up to its highest ideals, we can and must be better."

Obama said this in reference to the point that many people in America would like life to go back to "normal" in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. But, he wrote, "being treated differently on account of race is tragically, painfully, maddeningly 'normal'" for millions of Americans.

This difference, he wrote, comes "whether it's while dealing with the health care system, or interacting with the criminal justice system, or jogging down the street, or just watching birds in the park." Those last two points seemingly reference Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man who was shot and killed by two white men while on a jog in Georgia in February, and an incident in New York City's Central Park this week in which a white woman called the police on a black man who asked her to leash her dog.

My statement on the death of George Floyd: pic.twitter.com/Hg1k9JHT6R

— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) May 29, 2020

Floyd died after being apprehended by police Monday. A video that went viral shows an officer pinning his knee to Floyd's neck as he is on the ground, saying, "I can't breathe." The four officers involved have been fired, and investigations are ongoing. No charges have yet been announced.

His death in police custody has led to outrage across the nation and protests in many cities, including in Minneapolis, where violence has broken out over several nights this week.

In the statement that he posted to social media Friday, the former president also referenced conversations he has "had with friends over the past couple days about the footage of George Floyd dying face down on the street under the knee of a police officer in Minnesota."

These conversations included an email from "a middle-aged African American businessman" who wrote, "'the knee on the neck' is a metaphor for how the system so cavalierly holds black folks down, ignoring the cries for help."

He also referenced a video of 12-year-old Keedron Bryant singing a gospel song with lyrics written by his mother about being a young black man in America, and wrote that Keedron and Obama's friend share the same "anguish," as do Obama himself and "millions of others."

Ultimately, Obama wrote, it is up to officials in Minnesota to thoroughly investigate and seek justice for Floyd's death. But, he wrote, it is up to everyone "to work together to create a 'new normal' in which the legacy of bigotry and unequal treatment no longer infects our institutions or our hearts."

President Donald Trump said Thursday that he has not spoken to Floyd's family, but that he feels "very, very badly" and that what he saw in the video of Floyd's death "was not good, very bad." Attorney General Bill Barr and Trump are monitoring a Department of Justice investigation, according to officials.

On Friday morning, the president tweeted about the protests in Minneapolis, saying that "thugs are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd" and, referencing the military, that "when the looting starts, the shooting starts." This tweet was flagged by the social media platform as "glorifying violence."

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Prince Williams/WireimageBy DEENA ZARU, ABC News

(CHICAGO) -- By the time he was in the sixth grade, G Herbo had already started losing friends to gun violence and according to the Chicago rapper, for communities that deal with the brunt of the violence, the city has become a “mental illness war zone.”

The 24 year-old hip-hop artist, whose full name is Herbert Randall Wright III, has lost dozens of friends to gun violence and has reflected on the pain and loss in his music over the years.

In his latest album "PTSD," which was rereleased Friday with a cover to mark Mental Health Awareness Month, the rapper reflects on his own struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder -- a condition he realized he was dealing with after seeing a therapist about two years ago.

TUNE IN IF YOU EXCITED WE LISTENING EARLY IN THE APP 👉 https://t.co/hStOucmVtu#PTSDDELUXE pic.twitter.com/Ssmqz14bJI

— G HERBO (@gherbo) May 28, 2020

“The album being called PTSD is because I walk around everything with post traumatic stress disorder. I come from the streets, I come from not knowing if you’re going to make it home and being okay with it,” G Herbo told ABC News, adding that the majority of people in his community who experience gun violence “are walking around with this illness” and “we don't we don't even realize it.”

Karen Sheehan, the medical director of Strengthening Chicago’s Youth which seeks a public health approach to addressing gun violence, told ABC News that “social isolation” in a segregated city has led to the “normalization of violence” and the trauma it causes.

“We often talk about PTSD that you’ve had this one bad experience and it’s hard to recover. The problem is it’s never relenting, it’s gone on for generations. That’s more challenging because there isn’t a place for safety to come home,” Sheehan said.

“... For our poor young people and families in Chicago there isn’t any time you can ever escape. I can’t imagine how that unrelenting experience of repeated trauma wears on them and that makes it a much more difficult problem to solve.”

Even amid the stay-at-home order due to the coronavirus pandemic, gun violence is still on the rise in Chicago.

According to a 2019 report
by the Erikson Institute, a graduate school in child development in Chicago, “the majority of Chicago’s youngest children live in communities with high homicide rates, increasing the likelihood of an adverse impact on their early development due to environmental trauma.”

G Herbo said that by opening up about PTSD on his album, he wanted to encourage others to “lean towards your fears to make your situation better so you can understand the reality of what we’re going through.”

The rapper’s hope of helping others in his community is already resonating.

Dr. Jaleel Abdul-Adil, a clinical psychologist and the Co-Director of the Urban Youth Trauma Center at the University of Illinois in Chicago, has been infusing traditional therapy methods with hip-hop for thirty years in an effort to connect with young people and when PTSD was first released in February, it immediately caught his attention.

“When PTSD first came out, it immediately jumped out … especially when you’re working with trauma programs, how can you not?” Abdul-Adil said.

The chorus of album’s title track "PTSD," which features Chance the Rapper, Juice WRLD & Lil Uzi Vert, begins with this: “I got a war zone inside of my head/ I made it on my own, they said I'd be in jail or dead/ I've seen my brothers fall, over and over again/ Don't stand too close to me, I got PTSD.”

Abdul-Adil, who trains mental health providers and caretakers around the country to utilize hip-hop to connect with children, said that he first used G Herbo’s music in his sessions when the rapper released “Red Snow” in 2017 -- a somber and evocative song about a particularly deadly winter in Chicago following a rash of shootings.

He said that although music “doesn't solve all the problems,” “it can certainly inspire you to think, behave, connect and begin to try to address your problems much better than the traditional means that often don't engage youth.”

“So what I do is I take the traditional programs, which are based on research and employ social sciences that are based on best practices, but I kind of season them, if you will, with rap music and hip hop language, examples and different things so that kids can hear what we're saying,” he added.

When told in a later interview that his music is being used in therapy sessions, G Herbo said “it feels great” to know that his songs are generating a conversation about mental health.

“That's the reason I do music -- one of the reasons -- to be able to help people because my music is a reflection of my life and the things that I’ve been through. I use it as a form of therapy to help me get through situations.”

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Bastiaan Slabbers/iStockBy GENEVIEVE SHAW BROWN, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- With Walt Disney World planning to reopen its parks beginning July 11, there's much to know about significant changes guests will experience in the coming months.

Good Morning America detailed the safety measures put in place earlier this week. But there are additional changes. Among them:

No new ticket sales


According to the Disney Parks blog, "FastPass service will be suspended for the time being as we plan to use additional queue space to manage capacity at our attractions and maintain physical distancing. We will automatically cancel existing FastPass selections and share any future updates on the service at a later date. Also, please note that upon reopening, Extra Magic Hours will be temporarily suspended.

Canceled dining and experience reservations


All existing dining reservations and experience bookings, including Disney dining plans included in packages, have been canceled. Dining and experience bookings will reopen to limited numbers closer to the reopening dates. The parks will shift from a 180-day booking window to a 60-day booking window for dining and experience bookings going forward.

Walt Disney World plans to open Magic Kingdom and Animal Kingdom on July 11 and Epcot and Hollywood Studios on July 15. Disney Springs has already begun its phased reopening.

The Walt Disney Company is the parent company of ABC News.

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ABC NewsBy JUJU CHANG and ANTHONY RIVAS, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- Former NBA player Stephen Jackson says his longtime friend George Floyd, who called him his "twin," was in the middle of getting his life together when he was killed Monday after he was apprehended by Minneapolis police and pinned to the ground for more than seven minutes with a knee on his neck while he pleaded for his life.

Jackson said on Wednesday that he wants the police officers responsible for Floyd's death to receive the death penalty and that without that, the protests over his death will get worse. He spoke to ABC News just before a second night of what had been largely peaceful protests escalated into violence.

"You're going to see more and more stuff going on which I don't agree with, but people are not getting justice," Jackson told Nightline co-anchor Juju Chang. "Just losing a job is not enough. These people are really hurt. You're taking someone's life just because you can, because you know you're protected. ... It's going to get worse. Trust me, it's going to get worse."

"So let's get this right. Make these men pay for what they've done to my brother and keep the peace," he added, referring to the four Minneapolis police officers involved in Floyd's arrest who were terminated from their jobs Wednesday.

Jackson, who won an NBA championship with the San Antonio Spurs in 2003, said he could have "easily" been Floyd if it were not for the opportunities he had been given that led him down a different path. Jackson was born in Port Arthur, Texas, but regularly visited Floyd in his hometown of Houston. Jackson said the two became close and that they "looked out for each other" in Houston's South Side.

"When I was in Houston, he looked out for me," Jackson said. "So ... it was a relationship that grew over just being in the streets, growing up together. And we just became tight over the years, and the fact that we look alike made us grow even tighter."

As they grew older, Jackson said Floyd was there to support him during the 14 seasons he spent in the NBA, through all the ups and downs. Floyd, who was a high school football star and also played basketball, lived through Jackson's success.

"Every city, every team I played on, everywhere I was, we talked. He was excited. Everything I did," Jackson said. "He was excited because the first thing he said was, 'My twin is doing this. My twin is doing that.' He lived through me. He knew he had the talent, he had the same skills and everything I had. … I just had more opportunity."

Jackson said that although Floyd had associated with the wrong people in Houston -- he was charged in 2007 with armed robbery and sentenced to five years in prison as part of a plea deal in 2009 -- he had moved to Minneapolis to build a better life. He said Floyd had "beat the hood."

"He'd been through a lot of stuff in his life -- a lot of stuff -- and to make it out after you rehabilitate yourself and you're intelligent enough to know I can't go back to the same surroundings because it's gonna bring me back to the same spot," Jackson said.

"He was excited to tell me he was driving trucks and he was going to Minnesota and start over -- get a new start," he continued.

He said that the last time they spoke, one year ago, Floyd was preparing for a job interview in which he planned to wear a suit handed down by Jackson.

"He's like, 'Man, it fit me, man. I even got the shirt with your initials because I want people to know my twin gave me this shirt,'" Jackson said. "That's the type of person he was. ... He wanted everybody to know that we called each other 'twin.' And like I say, there wasn't many more people that was [more] proud of me than Floyd."

In addition to moving to Minnesota for work, Jackson said Floyd also wanted to become a better father.

"He [was] proud to see me live on my best days and being in a good place. He was happy to see that, and that's the direction he wanted to go. ... We were going in that direction together, and that's what I'm going to miss most about him -- that I know his best days were now. He was living his best days. He was becoming his best self," Jackson said.

Although a Minneapolis Police Department statement from Monday said Floyd "physically resisted officers" when they were called in "on a report of a forgery in progress," Jackson said it would have been unlike Floyd to resist arrest.

"I know his character; that ain't in his character. If you listen to him, he's calling out for his mom. He's calling out for his kids. This is a family guy. This is a loving guy," Jackson said. "The last thing he was thinking about was resisting arrest."

Jackson said that hearing about Floyd's death was unexpected, and that "it hurts that it happened to a good person."

"He was a stand-up guy and one of the best people I met. ... His heart was always in the right place and the video, showing him not resisting and all that, it just killed me that my brother's not here," he said.

Jackson said the video showing Floyd handcuffed and on his stomach as a Minneapolis police officer pressed down on his neck made him angry. In the video, Floyd could be heard calling for his late mother and pleading with the police to ease up on his neck, saying, "I can't breathe, please, the knee in my neck."

"[It] makes me angry. Makes me so angry because Floyd is one of the strongest people, you know. But to hear that scream and that cry for help in his voice, it's just wrong. It's just wrong. And he cried out for help," Jackson said tearfully. "It's just wrong man. It's just wrong. No way around the boy, it's wrong. ... Just picture it being a white guy with black cops. We wouldn't even be having this discussion."

Jackson said this incident with Floyd shouldn't be the wakeup call people need to start caring about police-involved killings. There have been "hundreds of other incidents" that should have woken people up, he said.

He also called out those who appropriate or buy into black culture, whether that's music or clothing, and implored them to step up.

"You cannot say you love me as the entertainer, actor or news personality ... and not love my people as a whole," Jackson said. "The white people that want to be black when it's time to buy music or it's time to be at concerts or it's time to dress black, if you want to be black, there is time to be black now. ... It's time for you to come ... and support the black culture."

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