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iStock/Thinkstock(BENTON, Ky.) -- Two teenagers have died and 17 other people are wounded after a shooting at a Kentucky high school Tuesday morning, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin said.

The suspect, a 15-year-old male student, was taken into custody, Bevin said.

Fourteen people suffered gunshot wounds, including the two victims who died, Bevin said at a news conference.

A 15-year-old girl, later identified as Bailey Nicole Holt, died at the scene and a 15-year-old boy, later identified as Preston Ryan Cope, died at the hospital, Bevin said.

Five others suffered other injuries, he said, calling the shooting "heartbreaking."

The shooting took place just before 8 a.m. local time at Marshall County High School in Benton, Kentucky, about 120 miles northwest of Nashville, Tennessee.

The scene has been secured, the state police said. It's believed that everyone who was injured was a student.

Five patients, all males ranging in age from 15 to 18, were taken to Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, doctors there said.

Among the patients was the 15-year-old boy who did not survive; he was shot in the head, doctors said.

The four remaining patients there are expected to survive, doctors said.

Bevin said the suspect will be charged with murder and attempted murder.

One student told ABC affiliate WHAS-TV in Louisville that he was in the library when he heard what sounded like a fight.

"Someone was hitting on the window. I took off my headphones and turned around and everyone was just broken up, they were running. I saw the flashes from the gunshots and by that time I was just running," he said. "We all started running toward the library office, and once we got in there, we just shut the lights off, sat down, locked the doors. We were taught what to do in a lockdown scenario and that's what everybody did."

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said the president has been briefed on the shooting.

"Our thoughts and prayers are with the families in Marshall County," Sanders said.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., tweeted Tuesday, "My thoughts are with the students, teachers, faculty, and the entire community. Thank you to the first responders who continue to put themselves in harm's way to protect others."

"The souls of Marshall County have been bruised and the fabric of the community has been torn, but the people of Benton, KY and the surrounding communities are strong," the governor tweeted Tuesday afternoon.

Bevin said earlier in a statement, "This is a tremendous tragedy and speaks to the heartbreak present in our communities. It is unbelievable that this would happen in a small, close-knit community like Marshall County."

The school shooting in Kentucky comes a day after a 15-year-old girl in Texas was shot and injured in her high school cafeteria, allegedly by a 16-year-old male student. The 15-year-old was hospitalized in unknown condition.


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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Volcanic eruptions in Japan, the Philippines and Bali. Massive earthquakes in Alaska and Indonesia.

The rash of natural disasters over the past two days have one common denominator: they all occurred along the so-called Ring of Fire, a sprawling horseshoe-shape geological disaster zone.

At least five different events occurred on the Ring of Fire on Monday and Tuesday, including a magnitude 7.9 earthquake that rattled the town of Kodiak, Alaska, and the eruption of Mount Kusatsu-Shirane near a ski resort northwest of Tokyo.

While the series of cataclysmic activity has come in rapid succession, scientists say most of them occurred thousands of miles apart and there is nothing to suggest they are connected.

"It's very unlikely that these things are related," William Yeck, a research geophysicist for the US Geological Survey, told ABC News on Tuesday.

Yeck said the Ring of Fire, which encompasses 452 volcanoes and where more than 80 percent of world's largest earthquakes occurred, is constantly active.

"This amount of activity isn't unusual," Yeck said.

The Ring of Fire stretches 25,000 miles. It goes from New Zealand up through Indonesia, the Philippines and Japan, and then across the Aleutian Islands and down the coasts of Alaska, Canada, the West Coast of the United States and all the way down to the tip of South America.

"It's largely the Pacific plate that makes up the majority of it," Yeck said.

But the ring also includes the Philippine Sea plate, Juan de Fuca and Cocos plates, and the Nazca Plate.

The tectonic plates fit together like a puzzle, but are constantly moving and colliding with each other, thus producing numerous earthquakes.

In addition to the volcanic eruption in Japan and the earthquake in Alaska, a magnitude 6.1 earthquake occurred off the southern coast of Java, Indonesia's mainland, on Tuesday. Also Tuesday, Mount Agung in Bali and Mount Mayon in the Philippines blew their tops, spewing red-hot lava and causing the evacuations of thousands of people.

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Scott Olson/Getty Images(LANSING, Mich.) -- Visibly distraught teenage girls and young women have filed into a Michigan court over the past week, detailing how they say a former USA Gymnastics team doctor sexually abused them for years.

They spoke at Dr. Larry Nassar’s sentencing hearing through their tears and outrage, alleging that his actions resulted in decades of trauma and destroyed relationships.

Each has been greeted by praise from the judge, who allowed more women than those involved in the criminal case against Nassar to speak after the doctor pleaded guilty last year to sexual assault charges.

And that’s for good reason, two legal experts said the judge’s decision to allow more than 150 people to share victim-impact statements.

"For years, victims argued that their voices were not being heard nor considered in the sentencing process," ABC News chief legal analyst Dan Abrams said.

"Victim-impact statements ensure they are heard. While in many cases they may not make or break the sentence handed down, judges are human and hearing about the horrific impact crimes have on the victims can certainly sway them when it’s a close sentencing call," he added.

In Nassar's trial, Ingham County Circuit Court Judge Rosemarie Aquilina is hearing the impact statements as part of the sentencing phase of Nassar's trial.

He pleaded guilty in November to the sexual assault charges before being sentenced separately in December to 60 years in federal prison on child pornography charges to which he has admitted.

He now stands to be sentenced to an additional 40 to 125 years on the sexual assault charges.

Aquilina opened the impact statements to dozens of people, including former patients, their relatives and at least one coach, who have taken her up on the opportunity to address both the court and Nassar.

Aquilina has praised each one of them, calling them brave and congratulating them on coming forward. She regularly notes how they should call themselves "survivors" instead of "victims."

"Leave the blame here and go out and do great things in the world," she said to one person who spoke in court today.

"Your message has been heard. You are so strong, and have a bright future and I so applaud you for coming forward," she said to another.

And they appear to be responding in kind both in the sheer number who have come forward to speak and in their words. One took a moment to say that by giving her statement, it "has only made us more resilient."

Hermann Walz, an adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, told ABC News, "I don't see any downside for people doing it."

While victims are regularly called as witnesses to testify in trials, Walz said, their statements are typically focused on the logistics of the crime, breaking down what happened and building a case.

The impact statement differs dramatically.

"Now they get to come and say, 'Now this is how it affected my life,'" Walz, also a litigator and former assistant district attorney, said. "Now you get to say this is how it destroyed my life.

"That's the last opportunity you're really going to get to speak to this person.”

Abrams noted that the statements "can be as painful as it is cathartic" for the people delivering them.

"In this case,” Abrams said of the Nassar statements, “I think it is so important for these victims to be able to [so eloquently] tell their horror stories to the court and the world.”

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Wayne Craig/Facebook(REDONDO BEACH, Calif.) -- Two men and a dog were saved Saturday after their sailboat crashed into a wall of rocks in Redondo Beach, California.

Video captured by witness Wayne Craig shows the dramatic rescue. Craig, who is a Redondo Beach resident, said he was walking alone the pier when he saw the boat crash into the rocks in King Harbor. After calling 911, he filmed the rescue.

“I saw the boat trying to come into the harbor and then go right into the rocks. It looked like a combination of issues,” Craig told ABC News. “I saw the diver just dive into the water.”

Grant Currie, who is part of the Redondo Beach Fire Department, was just getting back from a training exercise when the call came in. Currie, along with his captain, Matt Bandy, took their boat to the site of the accident, where they were faced with a dilemma.

“We couldn’t get close enough so we really only had bad options,” Currie said. “There was a lull in the water for a moment and I just jumped in and I swam up to the boat and told them they had to get in the water.” Currie said he was afraid that if they got too close by boat, they would get swept into the marooned sailboat.

The individuals, whose names were not released, were rescued with no major injuries.

The sailboat suffered engine and rudder damage, but according to Currie, the damage was not extensive.

These kinds of accidents happen a couple times a year and they can end up a lot worse, Currie said.

“We were fortunate," Currie said. "If those guys had been thrown off the boat on the other side they would have gotten killed.”

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ABC News(TAMPA, FLa.) -- Prosecutors will seek the death penalty against a suspected serial killer in Tampa who is accused of shooting and killing four people between Oct. 9 and Nov. 14, causing widespread fear in the Seminole Heights neighborhood.

The death penalty is for the "worst of the worst," Hillsborough County State Attorney Andrew Warren said at a news conference this morning.

"This case, in which the defendant murdered four innocent victims in a cold, calculated and premeditated manner, qualifies [for the death penalty]," Warren said.

The suspect, Howell Donaldson III, was arrested in late November after a nearly two-month search. Donaldson was found after a McDonald's manager alerted police that the suspect had handed over a McDonald's bag containing a gun, which authorities have said is linked to all four killings.

Donaldson is charged with four counts of first-degree murder and has pleaded not guilty. His attorney declined to comment today on Warren's announcement.

Warren said that some of the victims' families preferred seeking the death penalty while others preferred life in prison, but all were OK with prosecutors proceeding with the death penalty.

There is no evidence of mental illness or any other factor "giving us pause" in the decision to move forward, Warren said.

Warren said that while they cannot bring back the victims, prosecutors "can seek justice for their deaths, and we will."

Warren added that he is "heartbroken" for the suspect's parents.

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ABC News(PERRIS, Calif.) -- The California parents who allegedly tortured and held their 13 children captive were preparing to move "within days" of when the couple’s 17-year-old daughter escaped and alerted authorities, multiple sources told ABC News exclusively.

David Turpin, 57, was getting a job transfer from California to Oklahoma with the defense contractor Northrop Grumann, the sources said. And as a result, the family was preparing to move "within days" of Jan. 14, when the 17-year-old clambered out of a window and used a deactivated cellphone to dial 911 for help, according to police. Authorities quickly came to the house, ultimately arresting the parents and taking all 13 siblings into state custody.

Sources told ABC News, "There were boxes in the house consistent with moving –- concentrated in hallways, entryway and bedrooms."

It's not clear whether the move had any role in the timing of the 17-year-old daughter's escape.

The family had moved several times during the years, twice in Texas and once in California.

David and Louise Turpin, 49, accused of abusing their children for years, were arrested after the victims were found Jan. 14 at the home. The Turpins allegedly forced the children to shower only once a year, shackled them and beat them routinely, Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin said. The victims weren't released from their chains even to go to the bathroom, according to Hestrin. When found, they hadn't been to a doctor in over four years and had never been to a dentist, he added.

The siblings -- ages 2 to 29 -- have since been hospitalized.

All the victims except for the toddler were severely malnourished, Hestrin said, adding that the eldest victim -- a 29-year-old woman -- weighed only 82 pounds when rescued. He said another child, a 12-year-old, was the weight of an average 7-year-old.

David and Louise Turpin have each been charged with 12 counts of torture, 12 counts of false imprisonment, seven counts of abuse of a dependent adult and six counts of child abuse. David Turpin was also charged with one count of a lewd act on a child under the age of 14 by force, fear or duress. They have pleaded not guilty.

David Macher, a lawyer for David Turpin, told ABC News, "What we would like the public to know is that our clients are presumed to be innocent and that’s a very important presumption." He added, "We’re going to provide a vigorous defense."

Hestrin said, "We’re asking the public to reach out if they have any information about the case."

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iStock/Thinkstock(Witchita, Kan.) -- The family of an unarmed man who was fatally shot by police after they responded to a "swatting" prank is suing the city of Wichita, Kansas, and 10 police officers, calling the young man's death "unacceptable."

Andrew Finch's mother and sister filed the lawsuit Monday in the U.S. District Court of Kansas.

Finch, who was 28 years old and had two young children, was shot and killed by a Wichita police officer on Dec. 28. A team of officers had descended on Finch's home in response to a bogus 911 call made by a man in California who claimed there had been a shooting and kidnapping there.

"The family wants that young man held criminally responsible, but let’s be very clear about what happened," Andrew Stroth, the family's attorney, told ABC News. "The swatter didn’t shoot the bullet that killed Andy Finch. Responsibility for that case resides in that officer that used his high-powered rifle to shoot and kill Andy."

Finch's mother, Lisa Finch, told ABC News that the police stormed their home and placed the family in handcuffs.

"The police never announced themselves nor did they knock on the door, they never once let us know who was here, not one time," she said.

The man who allegedly placed the call, Tyler Barris, 25, is not named in the lawsuit. He is facing criminal charges of involuntary manslaughter, giving a false alarm and interference with a law enforcement officer.

Barris, who lives in California, has waived extradition to Kansas.

Barris, who has been linked to other swatting incidents, told ABC station KABC he regretted that the hoax led to Finch's death.

"I never intended for anyone to get shot and killed," he told the station. "I just wish I could have rewound somehow and just never done it."

Lisa Finch, meanwhile, said the Wichita Police Department is making Barris out to be the fall guy for her son's death.

"The Wichita Police Department is trying to make him the scapegoat and that's not going to happen," she said, referring to Barris.

The lawsuit seeks damages in excess of $75,000.

Stroth blamed the shooting on underlying issues, including what he said was the city's inability to properly train its officers to deal with mental health issues. The lawsuit cites an increase in police responding to mental health cases, yet claims the Wichita Police Department "failed to properly train and supervise its officers to deal with the mentally ill."

The lawsuit says police officers should call on and defer to Crisis Intervention Team officers to deal with the mentally ill. Stroth said that team is especially important now because of so-called swatting.

"Swatting is not a new phenomenon and pranking is not a new phenomenon and police have to be trained to deal with these situations," he said.

The city of Wichita said the investigation into the incident was still under review and "an appropriate response" to the lawsuit would be made once the city was served.

"The Dec. 28 WPD swatting incident has been investigated by the Wichita Police Department in conjunction with the Kansas Bureau of Investigation," the city of Wichita’s attorney Jennifer Magana said in a statement to ABC News. "That investigation is currently under review by the Sedgwick County District Attorney. The Department will also conduct a thorough internal review of the incident.

"City of Wichita and WPD officials have great sympathy for those impacted by the reckless behavior exemplified by "swatting" which created the circumstances which resulted in this death," Magana added.

None of the officers who responded to Andrew Finch's home, including the police officer who shot him, have been named.

"Andy Finch was an innocent victim, a 28-year-old man with two children, who lost his life because of an overzealous police officer and his high-powered rifle felt a threat that did not exist," said Stroth. "Andy Fitch should be alive today."

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Heavy snow and winds were subsiding in the upper Midwest on Tuesday morning as the blizzard that dumped over a foot of snow in parts came to an end. But the storm is currently moving into southern Canada and will bring different impacts to the Northeast.

The storm is moving east on Tuesday morning and bringing heavy rain and strong thunderstorms to much of the East Coast. Strong thunderstorms have already brought some large hail to parts of Ohio this morning. A wintry mix, including some freezing rain, will be possible Tuesday morning in parts of northern New England.

Given the chance for very heavy rain and complications from ice jams, flood watches have been posted for parts of the Northeast, including the suburbs of Albany, New York; Hartford, Connecticut; Boston and the city of Buffalo, New York. Flooding is already being reported in the Buffalo area due to ice jam-related flooding. Winter weather advisories have been issued where freezing rain and light snow could be an issue this morning.

As the storm moves east we are watching the potential for strong to severe thunderstorms in parts of the mid-Atlantic and Northeast. The risk is mainly for damaging winds, especially from North Carolina to New Jersey. A tornado cannot be ruled out in this region either. Strong winds are also possible in parts of southern New England and especially Rhode Island and southeast Massachusetts.

The heaviest of the rain will arrive around mid to late morning from Philadelphia to Boston.

Conditions will start drying out and cooling down later in the evening. By 7 p.m., the line of storms is expected to be moved out to the Atlantic Ocean.

Temperatures set to drop ... then rise


Ahead of the front we are seeing very mild conditions across the mid-Atlantic and Northeast. Temperatures in the mid 50s on Tuesday in New York, and near 60 in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. However, as soon as the front crosses, temperatures will begin to cool down.

It will feel noticeably cooler by the evening rush Tuesday on the I-95 corridor, and if you are going out for a late dinner, you should bundle up. Nearly a 20-degree temperature change is coming. On Wednesday morning it will be 38 degrees in New York City, right around average for late January.

The good news is the colder weather is going to be short-lived. Another period of mild weather is already in sight, and temperatures will be warming above average as we head into the end of the week and this weekend.

Outside of a series of storms in the northwest U.S., the weather pattern is about to quiet down temporarily with much of the rest of the country seeing drier conditions.

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iStock/Thinkstock(KODIAK, Alaska) -- A 7.9 magnitude earthquake off the southern coast of Alaska early Tuesday triggered fears of a tsunami along the state's coast and reaching the way south to the U.S. mainland's West Coast.

The earthquake happened just after 1 a.m. local time about 175 miles south of Kodiak, Alaska.

Residents of Kodiak were asked by police to move at least 100 feet above ground as a precaution.

Tsunami warnings were issued for the south coast of Alaska and the western edge of British Columbia. Watches were extended as far south as California. Hawaii was under a tsunami watch as well.



Sirens warned residents in Kodiak to head for higher ground ahead of a tsunami feared to hit the Kodiak area at about 1:45 a.m., according to the Kodiak Police Department.

There were no reports of damage from the initial quake.

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Obtained by ABC News(PERRIS, Calif.) -- New surveillance video shows some of the 13 California siblings who were allegedly held captive and tortured by their mother and father getting into a van after their parents' arrests.

The action unfolds in the upper left-hand corner of the video, where some of the siblings can be seen piling into the vehicle.

David and Louise Turpin, accused of abusing their children for years, were arrested after the victims were found Jan. 14 at their home in Perris. The Turpins allegedly forced the children to shower only once a year, shackled them and beat them routinely, Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin said. The victims weren't released from their chains even to go to the bathroom, according to Hestrin. When found, they hadn't been to a doctor in over four years and had never been to a dentist, he added.

The victims were rescued after one of the children -- a 17-year-old girl -- escaped through a window and called 911.

The siblings -- ages 2 to 29 -- have since been hospitalized.

All the victims except for the toddler were severely malnourished, Hestrin said, adding that the eldest victim -- a 29-year-old woman -- weighed only 82 pounds when rescued. He said another child, a 12-year-old, was the weight of an average 7-year-old.

David Turpin, 57, and Louise Turpin, 49, have each been charged with 12 counts of torture, 12 counts of false imprisonment, seven counts of abuse of a dependent adult and six counts of child abuse. David Turpin was also charged with one count of a lewd act on a child under the age of 14 by force, fear or duress. They have pleaded not guilty.

David Macher, a lawyer for David Turpin, told ABC News, "What we would like the public to know is that our clients are presumed to be innocent and that’s a very important presumption." He added, "We’re going to provide a vigorous defense."

Hestrin said, "We’re asking the public to reach out if they have any information about the case."

Anyone with information can call the tip line at the Riverside District Attorney's Office at 888-934-KIDS.

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Minnesota State Patrol (MINNEAPOLIS) -- Blizzard warnings are in effect Monday from Nebraska to Minnesota, as heavy snow and strong winds bring whiteout conditions to the Plains and Midwest.

The heaviest of the snow is expected in eastern Kansas and Nebraska, southern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, as well as the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where the forecast calls for 1 foot of snow. Travel is expected to be dangerous in those areas through the evening rush and into late tonight before clearing out overnight.

Snow and wind hit the Midwest and Plains


In Minnesota, Mankato and Owatonna both saw 6 inches of snow this morning, according to the National Weather Service. In Mankato, Mike Davis with Mankato Snow Removal told ABC News he has a crew of 20 men "working hard" to clear all the heavy snow from sidewalks in the downtown area on Monday.

He predicts each worker will cover about 5 miles Monday -- a job he said requires "mental toughness and lots of water."

The weather is causing major problems for travelers.

The Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport closed its runways today and in Chicago, at least 50 flights at O'Hare International Airport were canceled Monday morning because of the weather.

In Iowa, the snow and winds forced officials to shutter a portion of Interstate 29.

The Minnesota State Patrol posted these photos after a car crashed through a fence on a roadway in Rochester.

Rain and snow in the East

Showers and thunderstorms are moving through the Southeast from Tallahassee to Jacksonville in Florida, and up to Atlanta.

By this evening, snow and ice are expected to make its way into Northern New England.

On Tuesday, heavy rain is headed to Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, New York City and Boston.

The heavy rain is expected to mix with warm temperatures, potentially leading to some isolated flooding and ice jams in the Northeast.

The rain will move out before the evening rush hour.

By Tuesday evening, some lake-effect snow is possible in parts of western New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio.

January warmth

The January warmth will continue for the East Coast Tuesday, with temperatures in the 50's in the Northeast and upper 60s in the Southeast.

Temperatures will slip mid-week, before yet another warm-up for the East Coast by the weekend.

Colorado snow

Before the snow struck the Midwest and the Plains, a winter storm on Sunday blanketed areas near Denver with several inches of snow, causing treacherous travel and road conditions.

Heavy snow led to about 200 flights at Denver International Airport to be canceled, representing about 15 percent of its daily operations.

The Denver airport received about 6 inches of snow, while some of the hillsides saw totals closer to about 10 inches.

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Stockbyte/Thinkstock(SAVANNAH, Ga.) -- When Jarquita Arrington's 7-month-old baby started cooing recently in her graduate school class, she got help from an unlikely babysitter -- her business administration professor at Savannah State University.

Arrington, a mother of two juggling an M.B.A. program, had to bring her son, Panda, on her first day of school after her husband's meeting ran late, according to local ABC affiliate WJCL-TV.

"I said, 'Oh my gosh! I can't miss class!'" Arrington said.

That's when she reached out to her professor, Dr. Rebecca Setliff, to ask if she could bring Panda to class.

Setliff, who is an adjunct professor, agreed. But when Panda started fussing in class, Setliff decided to lend a helping hand.

"She walked over to the baby and said: 'Well, let me see the baby. Let me see if I can quiet him back down again,'" Arrington recalled.

Setliff carried Panda for the rest of the lecture and discussion.

"I wanted to help her," Setliff said. "And I wanted her to be able to focus on staying in the class, on focus on the class discussion. Because my classes are heavy discussion."

Setliff said she understands life can get overwhelming for her students.

"We as faculty need to work with them, and remember that," Setliff said. "Just so they get to classes just like a job."

Arrington said she had several options for graduate school, but professors like Setliff are the reason why she goes to Savannah State.

"You're able to get that individualized attention as a student as opposed to maybe being a number because you're in a classroom with maybe 150 kids," she said.

As for Panda, he remained calm in Setliff's arms for the rest of the lecture and discussion.

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iStock/Thinkstock(SAN JUAN) -- Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello has announced that the bankrupt island's utility company will be privatized.

In a televised statement, Rosello said the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, was a heavy burden on the island's residents.

PREPA "will stop existing as ineffectively as it does today," Rosello said.

Portions of the energy authority will be sold off in the coming days, the governor said.

Rossello said the current electrical grid is 28 years older than the industry average in the United States. He said that the move will get the island to a goal of more than 30 percent of renewable energy generation.

Puerto Rico was plunged into darkness after Hurricane Maria slammed into the island on Sept. 20 as a Category 4 hurricane.

Rosello called the move a "leap into the modernization of Puerto Rico."

San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz criticized the privatization, tweeting: "The privatization of PREPA will put the economic development of the country in private hands. The authority will serve other interests."

About a third of customers on the island remains without power, according to Puerto Rico's government.

In December, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers told ABC News in a statement: “We estimate 100 percent of customers will have power restored by the end of May.”

PREPA did not have an immediate reaction to the announcement.

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U.S. Army(WASHINGTON) -- A nonprofit organization has stepped in to provide death benefits to families of two soldiers killed in an Apache helicopter crash over the weekend.

Due to the government shutdown, the families did not receive the $100,000 death benefit provided for the death of a service member under any circumstance either stateside or overseas. Families typically use the benefit to cover the travel and funeral costs associated with the loss of their loved one. It's not clear whether they will receive the payments from the government if it reopens.

The nonprofit organization Fisher House Foundation, which works with military families, announced it would provide the death benefits to the families of 1st Lt. Clayton R. Cullen, of Indiana, and Chief Warrant Officer 2 Kevin F. Burke, of California, who were both assigned to the 4th Combat Aviation Brigade, 4th Infantry Division.

The soldiers were killed on Saturday morning when their AH64 Apache helicopter crashed during training operations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California.

In a statement, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said he had worked with the CEO of the Fisher House Foundation to assist military families during the shutdown.

"The Fisher House generously agreed to offer the families an advance grant until the government can make reimbursements at an appropriate time," the statement read. "The Fisher House will also cover flights, hotels and other incidentals for family members."

Nine days into the 2013 government shutdown, the Pentagon announced a partnership with the Fisher House Foundation in which the charity would pay the $100,000 to families. It was days later that Congress passed a law that would allow the Pentagon to pay families the amount during that specific shutdown. Once that law took effect, Fisher House announced it would give families an additional $25,000.

The Army said the cause of Saturday's helicopter crash is under investigation.

"We are all deeply saddened by the deaths of 1st Lt. Clayton R. Cullen and Chief Warrant Officer 2 Kevin F. Burke," said Col. Scott Gallaway, commander, 4th CAB, 4th Inf. Div. "These gentlemen exemplified all the attributes we expect from our very best leaders. They were selfless, mission-focused, and committed to their teammates. Our heartfelt prayers and condolences go out to Clayton's and Kevin's Families. These two young leaders left an indelible mark on the entire Iron Eagle team. We will forever be better Soldiers, and a more combat-ready aviation brigade, due to their leadership."

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ABC News(LAKE WALES, Fla.) -- A day after police said two pipe bombs detonated in an unpopulated part of a mall in Lake Wales, Florida, the FBI now believes the incident was caused by a pair of marine flares.

"There is no indication of any explosion at the mall and no pipe bombs were found," according to a statement released Monday by the FBI's Tampa field office. "It appears two items, believed to be marine flares, were ignited in a mall hallway, creating a large amount of smoke, and a backpack was located at the scene."

Bomb technicians "examined the contents of the backpack and determined it did not contain any incendiary or explosive devices," the statement said.

Any fears of terrorism have so far been ruled out.

"There is no current indication of any terrorist connection to this incident," the statement added.

A statement published on the Eagle Ridge Mall's website echoed the FBI, saying that "two signal flares triggered a fire alarm" and that it was open for business.

It was a different story Sunday night, however.

The reports coming from local authorities suggested the mall had sustained some kind of nefarious attack.

Authorities said Sunday evening that two improvised explosive devices had detonated in the corridor of the mall.

After Lake Wales police arrived, the mall was quickly evacuated and a perimeter established. No injuries were reported.

Emergency personnel from surrounding counties responded to the mall around 5:30 p.m. Lake Wales Police Department Deputy Chief Troy Schulze said initially there was a "smoke alarm" inside a remote, unpopulated service corridor.

When authorities arrived, "they determined that an IED, or a pipe bomb explosive, had detonated in the corridor," Schulze said.

Cops soon made the determination that it was not just one pipe bomb that went off, but two.

Then, Schulze said, authorities found a "backpack or book bag that contained five or six other IEDs that were not detonated," adding that those devices were "safely removed."

"We had guys go in and do a cursory search to make sure there wasn't anything else suspicious or out of place," he said.

Schulze said multiple witnesses told police about a middle-aged man -- with a "heavy/stocky build, wearing a gray shirt and gray hat" -- seen running from the area.

"If anybody knows or hears anything we hope they would contact us," he said on Sunday.

It's unclear if police or the FBI are still in pursuit of this person-of-interest given the new information.

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